Simon and his fake shipping job

Oh, Simon.  You think I don’t know about you.  Your name changes, but the game is the same.  You tell me about a part0time job with a great salary and think I’ll forget everything I’ve learned (and am still learning) about scammers.  You tried, though, and that means I’m going to share what you shared with me.

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From:  Simon Torres (studio.ziaco@alice.it)

Subject:  Find new work , (92571660729)

Greetings.

This message is a request to your resume that we found in CareerBuilder and we would like you to try for our new FREELANCE position.

A state & international team is seeking a part-time shipping/receiving Operator. The job demands working 2-3 hours a day at most on the PC. The job is consistent and the schedule is variable. The position suits those people who can work by themselves.

Job Description: receiving and sending incoming packages, maintaining documents for all shipping & receiving activities, packaging and managing picking up of all outcome goods.
Monthly income is nearly $1,500.

Requirements: 21+ years of age, permanent access to Internet.

When interested please reply with information requested below so as to make sure we have your name and other information correctly.

– Full name:
– Country of residence, State:
– Contact number:

Please note: In the event we do not call you your resume will remain in our system to consider you in future.

——

Does anyone have permanent access to the Internet?  Nope.

I won’t let scammers keep me from finding the perfect home-based position and neither should you.  Career Builder does attract scammers, but so do other job search sites.  It’s up to us to know the difference between legitimate and fraudulent inquiries.

Good luck and be safe.

Fake job opportunity from D&B Packaging & Shipping

It’s getting close to the start of another school year, so that means scammers are targeting parents and college students. They know how much we have to shell out in the pre-season and hope that our wishes fro more money make us less leery of offers that are too good to be true.

Caroline Brent emailed me with an offer and may email you as well.

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From: Caroline Brent (kitamura@adepoplanners.com

Subject:  Fresh job _ (3229339066176)

D&B Packaging & Shipping is one of the best companies in the sphere of forwarding business. We provide our reshipping services for people who need to have their purchases delivered outside the U.S. Our main goal is to make sure our customers purchases are safely delivered to them in the shortest time possible. We would be glad to offer you an opportunity to become our Administrative Assistant.
We found your resume on CareerBuilder and we think you could be an ideal candidate for this position. As an Administrative Assistant, you’ll be eligible for competitive salary as well as for significant monthly rewards from our company.
Our standard requirements are:
– High school diploma (or GED equivalent) – ability to work with Windows PC or Mac – proficiency in MS Office or Open Office – stable Internet access – ability to handle office equipment (e.g. printer and scanner)
Any related experience would be beneficial, however, it is not compulsory. We will also expect you to be attentive with all the documentation and of course with our customers purchases. Please reply to this email so that our HR representative can get in touch with you so that to provide more information.
Good luck! Regards, HR Agent Caroline Brent

————–

If the job details or email address seems familiar, it’s because Wallace Campbell emailed me from the same address about a Packaging Manager position the other day.  I told you, some scammers don’t even try to hide anymore.

Don’t let the number of scammers approaching you from Career Builder turn you away from your job search.

Be safe.

Stalked by Stacy, David, and Harley and their fake offers

Apparently I’m irresistable and Stacy is desperate to reach me. Her friend, Harley, is almost as desperate.  Eight emails from Stacy, seven from David, and ten from Harley is the past three weeks.  I want to be this popular when it comes to legitimate offers!  Anyway, they both tell me that I have a pending deposit that needs verification.  Sometimes it’s $612 and others it’s nearly $5,000.

Subject lines include

  • Your deposit for $4,409.29 requires verification
  • Approval of Payment
  • Alert: $612 For (insert email address here) – Please Fill Form
  • (Support) Did you receive your deposit?
  • RE: Pending Payment For (insert email address here)… CLAIM NOW.
  • Congratulations: You’ve Made A Commission!
  • Your Check Is Waiting…

Even my email provider is on to them.  Several of the messages were flagged with a message stating that similar messages are used to steal user information.

Guess what they all have in common?  A Linear Success Formula or Accelerated Results Formula email address.  Ignore these people, do not click on any of their links.

Fake job opening message from Lael Nelson

Lael Nelson emailed me the other day and I left the message unread until today.  Why would I do that as a job seeker?  Lael is a crook, plain and simple.  Anytime I see the generic “job opening” email subject line, I save the message for later. This message had all the scam job keywords. I’m slightly disappointed that he didn’t try harder.

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From: Lael Nelson (zosyq@netvigator.com)

Subject: Job opening / (0539365195409)

Hello ! The mail forwarding team is looking for shipping/receiving Operator.

No enrollment fee. The average monthly salary is $1500.

Job Duties and responsibilities:

– Must be able to work on flexible schedules – the position is home-based
– Receive and mail incoming shipments. Auditing incoming packages for damages.
– Complete all paperwork in a timely and accurate manner.

Qualifications:
– Applicants must be mature – 21 years and older, able to work independently, prioritize the work in an accurate and efficient manner, permanent access to Internet.

In case interested please reply with data asked below so as to make sure we have your name and other information correctly.

– Your Full Name:
– Your Country, State:
– Your Contact number:

Please note: If you do not receive a call or email from our company, your information will be kept in our record for future consideration.
Thank you.

—-

See that last note?  It’s not unusual for employers to make similar statements.  Make no mistake, though, Lael or his representative will likely call or email with either a job or interview offer.  Once the scammer thinks you’re hooked, they try to reel you in.

Price Thornton, Kane Benjamin, Hamilton Fitzpatrick, Ivor Collins, and Beck Allison sent almost identical messages and some share the same reply to address.

Lael Nelson and company think you’re not smart enough to see through the lies. Prove them wrong.

Fake Marketing position

Fake jobs ads and offers set my teeth on edge.  It’s hard enough to find legitimate home-based positions with so many scams muddying the waters.  It’s even more difficult for companies to believe that qualified candidates for telecommuting options exist when so many fake positions and unqualified candidates try to jump on every offer.  That’s a post for another day. Today’s post is about a fake job lead that’s potentially a scammy home business lead.

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From:  Marketing Dept. (support@digitalbinaryoptions.net)

Subject:  Rare Job Opportunities

Hello,

Unfortunately one of our valued team members have

recently left our team, this means we have a rare opening

in out corporation.

This position offers a starting salary of $250,500, plus

An outstanding benefits package tailored specifically to

you.

Learn More Here … 

You do not need any experience or qualifications, only

a willingness to learn, a few hours out of your day, and

an internet connection.

Sound like you?

Apply Now!

There is only one space available and it will be filled

quickly, so we recommend applying today.

Thanks,

Mary

1710 E INDIAN SCHOOL RD

85026 Phoenix
ARIZONA
UNITED STATES

———

First, there is no $250,000 position that does requires no experience or education.  This should be the biggest and clearest red flag in the message.

Second and third, all of the links included in the email point to different pages of Goldbar One, which offers small business software (lead generation, shopping cart software, merchant accounts, and the like) and an affiliate program.  Goldbar Enterprises, LLC is based in Florida according to the administrator information.  According to the email, Mary is based in Phoenix, Arizona.  According to a quick address search, the address at the bottom of the email does not exist.  1710 East Indian Road does exist, but not at that zip code.

The fourth red flag is the original email Mary sent the message from.  Digital Binary Options offers guides on binary options trading strategy.  There is no mention of Mary, the high paying position, or Goldbar Enterprises, LLC.

This scammer almost covered the bases for reeling in job seekers. but Mary – or whoever the scammer is – has no fear of potential victims who do their homework.  The scammers wants people who click quickly with minimal provocation.  Don’t ever click job or business leads with minimal provocation.  Keep your eyes open for inconsistencies and big promises. Listen to that voice that tells you to wait a minute.

Until next time.