Telecommuting job posts are not always what they seem

Lately I’ve been stumbling across leads on legit job sites and my newspaper’s classified ad that are not always jobs.  Business opportunities are occasionally posted under employment instead of biz ops.  I personally think this is a little sneaky, but it’s not unethical as long as the one placing the ad explains that it is a business opportunity once contact is made.

Scam artists are also posting “jobs” in various places, but these tend to show up online on free classified sites or social networks.  These ads describe call center, data entry, or virtual assistant positions with hourly salary ranges from $10-15 or higher.  People respond and receive a message telling them to send payment for training materials “to prove that they’re serious.”

Again, no legitimate company offering a job will require payment for training materials.  Business opportunities usually do charge a fee of some kind, but that detail is made known from the beginning.

One of the scams I checked into required applicants to ‘sign a nondisclosure agreement.’  Guess what?  If the person is doing something that is illegal, then they cannot try to hold anyone to a legally binding agreement.

When I run across anything fraudulent I will share.  If you run across something and are not sure if it’s a scam or not, run a search.  Google the “company name scam” or “position title scam” and view the results.   Search the telecommuting moms board on wahm.com, too.  Members there have no problem calling out scammers and that’s one of the reasons I love it there.

Good luck in your search and be careful!  The start of summer vacation, beginning of the school year, and the holidays are scammer hunting seasons.  They’re hunting for us and we need to send them home with empty pockets.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Telecommuting job posts are not always what they seem

  1. Great advice. But one thing- a nondisclosure agreement isnt always a sign of fraudulant activity. It is legit in lots of situations and sometimes needed.

  2. Hi and thanks for your comment. I was referring only to scam artists using nondisclosures in an attempt to keep what they’re doing quiet, not to the use of them overall.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s